7 Reasons You Should Create a Mailing List for Your Blog

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7 reasons for a mailing list

Though people consider it outdated, email has only evolved and grown stronger. The reason? People read emails that promise good reads for the future.

If your site has content worth reading, you should consider a mailing list. Here’s why.

Discover your audience.

With a comprehensive list of all your followers, you could schedule content for your audience’s time zones, and increase chances of them revisiting your site.

It’s human. 

Amidst the social media clutter, email is a quiet way to reach an audience with a personal touch. There are no middlemen, no advertisements, and no promotions. Only honest communication between two people on a shared interest. Personal emails gain trusted readership.

It’s pocketbook friendly. 

Everyone has email, and its ubiquity lets you reach more people without worrying about the cost. It’s also easy to set up and automate a mailing list so you can reap the benefits with minimum effort.

You’ll find beta readers. 

Whether you’re working on a new project or a novel, you’ll find beta readers in your followers. They would be willing to review your work and tell you what works and what doesn’t.

Improve engagement. 

As your readership grows, so will the interaction on your site. You could involve readers in conversations and ask them to become evangelists of your blog by spreading the word.

Get targeted feedback.

Your subscribers are regular readers, and no one knows your work better. You can get honest opinions on your work, or even conduct a net promotional survey to assess your progress.

It motivates you. 

Growing numbers are encouraging. Watching your audience grow will motivate you to share better stories more often. This in turn boosts engagement and promotes your name.

A mailing list helps you create a solid online presence. From a simple blog, you can build up your credibility, and even make a business of it.

It all starts with a simple subscription form.

Do you have a mailing list on your business website? How do you use your mailing list to improve your online brand? Let us know in the comments.

Three successful techniques to engage “one-on-one” with visitors of your content

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You’ve got tons of content, and people are consuming it, but
you’re not talking to them at the point of consumption, which would be the best
time to launch them through your sales pipeline.

At the CRM Evolution Conference in New York City, I chatted
with Kate Leggett, a Senior Analyst with

She covers the area of customer service and call center processes serving
business process professionals.

In our interview, Leggett offered three techniques for
connecting readers of your content with your CRM system:

  1. Authenticate site access
    If you require people to log in to get access to your content, you can see from
    their session history the pieces of content they looked at and interacted with.

  2. Pushing a chat box
    If you don’t have someone logged in, you’re going to have to reach out to
    connect. If they delay on a content page push a chat box notification and ask
    if they have any questions.

  3. Make contact really easy
    Around every piece of content, make connecting via phone, email, or chat
    extremely easy and encouraged.

Gaining benefit from social media when you don’t even use social media

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Social customer care is great if you’re using a social channel. Problem is there are still plenty of people that only use traditional channels and get no advantage from the social channels.

At the CRM Evolution Conference I spoke with Ian Jacobs, a Senior Analyst on Customer Interaction for Ovum. Jacobs offered up a possible non-adhoc scenario to integrate social media into the knowledge management database as core corporate information.

The social channel handles things that aren’t in the company’s knowledge database. How do you get at that knowledge and then get it into the company, asked Jacobs. The trick is finding a method to validate the correctness. The technology to do just that is not fully baked, admitted Jacobs.

Ultimately, what Jacobs envisions is a series of automated tasks that use trust mechanisms, which then make that social input part of the company’s overall knowledge base.