Three successful techniques to engage “one-on-one” with visitors of your content

Posted by Posted on by
0




You’ve got tons of content, and people are consuming it, but
you’re not talking to them at the point of consumption, which would be the best
time to launch them through your sales pipeline.


At the CRM Evolution Conference in New York City, I chatted
with Kate Leggett, a Senior Analyst with

Forrester
.
She covers the area of customer service and call center processes serving
business process professionals.


In our interview, Leggett offered three techniques for
connecting readers of your content with your CRM system:










  1. Authenticate site access
    :
    If you require people to log in to get access to your content, you can see from
    their session history the pieces of content they looked at and interacted with.









  2. Pushing a chat box
    :
    If you don’t have someone logged in, you’re going to have to reach out to
    connect. If they delay on a content page push a chat box notification and ask
    if they have any questions.




  3. Make contact really easy
    :
    Around every piece of content, make connecting via phone, email, or chat
    extremely easy and encouraged.

Gaining benefit from social media when you don’t even use social media

Posted by Posted on by
0


Social customer care is great if you’re using a social channel. Problem is there are still plenty of people that only use traditional channels and get no advantage from the social channels.

At the CRM Evolution Conference I spoke with Ian Jacobs, a Senior Analyst on Customer Interaction for Ovum. Jacobs offered up a possible non-adhoc scenario to integrate social media into the knowledge management database as core corporate information.

The social channel handles things that aren’t in the company’s knowledge database. How do you get at that knowledge and then get it into the company, asked Jacobs. The trick is finding a method to validate the correctness. The technology to do just that is not fully baked, admitted Jacobs.

Ultimately, what Jacobs envisions is a series of automated tasks that use trust mechanisms, which then make that social input part of the company’s overall knowledge base.