Clipboard functions in Zoho Writer

Posted by Posted on by
0

Many users while accessing Zoho Writer from Firefox (mostly 1.5+) would have faced difficulty while using clipboard functions like Cut, Copy and Paste. While the keyboard shortcuts work fine, why exert stress on Ctrl+V while an alternative solution exists?
Firefox, for security reasons, disables Cut, Copy and Paste commands in the rich text editor. These settings can be changed:

(1) Visit your ‘profile folder’ and create a new file named ‘user.js’. Here’s how you can locate the profile folder for various Operating Systems.

(2) Add these four lines to the user.js file:

user_pref(“capability.policy.policynames”, “allowclipboard”);
user_pref(“capability.policy.allowclipboard.sites”, “http://www.zohowriter.com”);
user_pref(“capability.policy.allowclipboard.Clipboard.cutcopy”, “allAccess”);
user_pref(“capability.policy.allowclipboard.Clipboard.paste”, “allAccess”);

(3) Save the file and restart Firefox.

This should solve the issue. Else, after saving the file, feed a a little bit of magic potion i.e. do a system restart and Clipboard functions will work in Firefox.

When does Zoho Writer get Wonky?

Posted by Posted on by
0

Many people put Zoho Writer to several uses. I use it, among other things, to share movie scripts with my equally film-obsessed friends.  Unlike your normal documents, film scripts are unusally long. With a minimum of 10000 words, they may go upto 30000 words. Using Zoho Writer to edit and share them is a hard test for Zoho Writer’s performance, especially when testing with a turtle speed of 256 kbps, albeit DSL internet. (Yeah well, if it works with the barest minimum requirements, it will work in better environments, right? :) ). Performance is gauged by the response time. (or atleast that’s what users look for)

So while doing the above mentioned test, the following observations were made: Editing, including any copy-paste function took less than five seconds. Saving the entire document (of around 10000 words) took around twelve seconds. Timing the response isn’t a difficult thing to do. For Firefox users, the Fasterfox plug-in will measure the response time before an action is completed. Try for yourself and see! And do let us know.

On Maxthon

Posted by Posted on by
0

TechCrunch published an article yesteray about Maxthon browser. It strongly recommended Maxthon as an alternative to Firefox and Opera. Daily Om also reported recently that Maxthon crossed 50 Million Downloads. So what are Maxthon’s strong points that make it popular?

Firstly, the features it offers. Tabbed browsing and built in RSS reader have become the standards of any web browser after Firefox’s success. Maxthon has these, and more. Tabbed browsing is a lot easier in Maxthon. Tabs can be given a “Sticky” short name to page titles, so that when having something like 20 tabs open at a time, one doesn’t have to fish out too much. Tabs can be aligned too.
Also, Maxthon requires fewer Extensions than Firefox. Built in Flash support, right click enabled almost everywhere, a customizable Utility manager on the toolbar for easy access of frequently used Computer utilities such as Notepad, URL aliases – something that can be done in Firefox by installing an extra extension to use a short URL. Most of the features require no extensions to be installed.

But many of the ready to use features make it look clumsy as opposed to the sleek elegance of Firefox, which is, by the way, a lot faster than Maxthon. Also, in terms of Searching within the browser, Firefox is a lot less painful to use – albeit it requires a few extensions such as “Context Search” to be installed. Also, Mozilla’s Mycroft Plug-in site provides more plug-ins that can be installed for searching within the website – apart from the standard Google, Yahoo, Amazon search, one can include BitTorrent, Answers.com and many other reference websites. Maxthon supports Wikipedia and IMDb, in addition to Google Search. Not much, really.

Atleast as far as browsers are concerned, more doesn’t mean better. A lot of features that Maxthon comes packed with are not useful really. This is why I disagree with the TechCrunch article. Firefox’s idea of “Provide some really useful features as a basic package, and let the users download extensions if they want more” is great because the requirements of each user vary. This article provides insight into various browsers. But there is no “the best browser”; Firefox 1.5 has its share of flaws (or “The Dark Side” as the above mentioned article refers)

Really, the browser wars will never end.